Hot-Smoked Mackerel with Gremolata 

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Mackerel is a beautiful oily fish, both for its iridescent, striking skin and its rich, fishy flavour. Mackerel has a distinctive flavour and is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. Mackerel is a comparatively sustainable fish, although the Marine Conservation Society recommends only buying line-caught, UK-landed mackerel where possible.

Mackerel are migratory and come to the UK in spring and early summer, when they will feed actively and then migrate to warmer seas in the autumn months to spawn, therefore the best time to catch and eat this delicious fish is in July. 

You will need: (Serves 4)

 

  • 4 butterflied mackerel
  • 2 tbsp fine smoking chips (Apple or hickory)
  • 2 lemons
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 bunch of parsley
  • 100ml olive oil
  • salt and pepper

To make:

1) Go to your local fishmongers and ask for 4 butterflied mackerel.
2) Preset your oven to 180c. Get A deep roasting tin with a wire rack and in the bottom, neatly pile a couple of pinches of wood chips. Season the fish with salt and pepper and place it on the wire rack. Light the wood chips until the chips start to smoulder and produce smoke, then place the rack over the flame and cover in foil. Transfer the tin to the oven for 7-10 mins until the fish is just cooked.
4) To make the gremolata, zest one of the lemons and squeeze the remaining juice into a bowl. Grate the garlic and finely chop the parsley. Mix this all together, season with salt and pepper and loosen with olive oil.
5) To serve, carefully take the mackerel out of the roasting tin, drizzle with gremolata and serve with a wedge of lemon.

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