Pickled Chanterelles

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Chanterelles are a prized ingredient and a forager’s favourite. Succulent and delicate in flavour, chanterelle is used by chefs the world over. Yellow or orange in colour, smelling of apricots, chanterelles are a Spook favourite too. Chanterelle is the common name for several species of wild, edible fungi in the Cantharellaceae family. They appear between summer and late autumn in woodlands and have a fruity aroma when first picked.

Chanterelle is eaten widely and can be very expensive. It is considered a gourmet fungus by many chefs because of its delicate flavour and succulent texture. It also has medicinal qualities, particularly antibacterial and antiviral properties and contains eight essential amino acids.

You will need:

  • 500g chanterelles
  • 8 black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 500ml white wine vinegar
  • 1 clove of garlic, finely sliced
  • 1 sprig of rosemary
  • 1 bay leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon flaky sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • Good quality olive oil (not extra-virgin, which is too strongly flavoured), enough to cover the mushrooms in the jars

Method

  1. In a dry frying pan, roast the peppercorns and coriander seeds, shaking the pan frequently so that they don’t burn. Set aside.
  2. Pour the vinegar into a large pan. Add the roasted spices, garlic, herbs, ground spices, sugar, salt and 500ml water. Stir and bring to a boil.
  3. Add the chopped mushrooms, bring them to a simmer and cook for 15–20 minutes (or until the mushrooms are cooked through). Remove the pan from the heat and leave to cool a little.
    Scoop out the mushrooms with a slotted spoon and spread them onto a clean tea towel to dry.
  4. Pack the dry pickled mushrooms into the jars, and pour in enough olive oil to cover. Fasten the lids onto the jars and shake them gently to ensure there are no air bubbles and all the mushrooms are well covered. Store the jar in a cool place – unopened, they should keep for up to 2 months. Goes great with venison, fried duck eggs and monkfish.

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